Cork Snake from Italy

Italy is famous for its wine. This Italian toy speaks volumes about the culture, because it is made entirely of wine corks! Many of the parents in Italy either grow grapes to make wine or work at a winery where the grapes are turned into wine.

Suggested Age for Child: This toy is suitable for children 10 and above to make, with adult supervision.

Materials Needed:

1. Wine corks. The more you have, the longer your snake will be. 2. Paper clips cut across the middle. Youíll have to use wire snips to cut these, so leave this job for an adult. 3. Two thumbtacks, straight pins, or small nails. 4. A small piece of red ribbon. 5. Paint, glitter, and whatever else you want to decorate your slithery snake.

Directions:


1. Take the half paper clip and push the two ends into the center of one of the ends of the cork, leaving the rounded top sticking out. Itís easier to do if you get an adult to grasp the paper clip with a pair of pliers and push it into the cork.
2. Take another half paper clip and link it into the first one. Then, push this paper clip into another wine cork. The two corks should be joined together by the two paper clips at this point.
3. Do this as many times as you want, each time making the snake a little longer. But remember, if you make your snake too long, the paper clips probably wonít hold together too well.
4. Take the two push pins and put them on the ďheadĒ of the snake. Position them so that they look like the snakeís eyes.
5. Have an adult make a slit in the front of the snakeís head. This will be your snakeís mouth. Push the piece of red ribbon into the slit and glue it into place. This is your snakeís red hissing tongue.
6. Now, paint your Cork Snake any color you like. The brighter the better!

How to Play:
Pull the toy along the floor and see how it moves just a snake. Donít worry, though Ė it canít bite.

If you have any additional information abut this toy or have a toy you've made or seen made please contact us!
info@worldplay.org We'd love to hear from you.

Photo taken by Marc Mnich copyright 1997,1998